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Substitute Teacher Magazine is looking for authors. Information on submitting to the magazine can be found by clicking here.  Submissions can be printed anonymously, please request if you would like us to not print your name or location. Please contact submissions@subteachermag.com

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Welcome to the Frontpage
"What can I do this summer to prepare for next year’s subbing assignments?" PDF Print E-mail

Dear Barbara,

Summer is here and I’m enjoying my free time. But I feel as if I should be doing something! Do you have any ideas for me? I want to be sure that I can be prepared and successful for my very first call to sub in the 2010-2011 school year.  

Doug
Cooper City, CA

Read more: "What can I do this summer to prepare for next year’s subbing assignments?"
 
August 2010 Letters to the Editor PDF Print E-mail

Is it asking too much to be considered in a nice manner (let alone hired) as a substitute when I lack a certificate but have instead experience subbing in other states and other Catholic schools within my state of Washington? I even have completed all the ed courses except student teaching. I guess I thought I could do an "end-around" certification by getting sub experience in other cities. I was successful directing classrooms by myself. I am just not accepting the odds of being from a city with only one Catholic high school and having them enforce their "standards" to the letter, when the more cosmopolitan Seattle area will consider anyone with a bachelors and outstanding moral character. Anyone have any stories to share with me? No one seems to be enlightened here as to other ways to assess one's qualifications for substitute teaching (actually having done it for starters and having loads of life experience and commitment to the religion of the school). I believe my experience is the equivalent of student teaching in intensity, classroom management, and rapport with kids. What more do they need? Oh, that darn piece of paper that costs thousands of dollars, makes you attend courses that are repetitive and universally acclaimed as content poor...that's all.
~Anonymous

 
"Are Rewards the Answer?" PDF Print E-mail
Dear Barbara,

I read your book and I have followed your advice about keeping rewards in my Bag of Tricks. I am concerned about students working and behaving well so that they can get a sticker or a certificate. Shouldn’t children learn to be self motivated?  I’m getting tired of “bribing” students! Is there a better way?

Jamie
Cherry Hill, NJ
Read more: "Are Rewards the Answer?"
 
August 2010 Tech Tips PDF Print E-mail
If you have a personal account on the Internet, keep the information and pictures professional. If a student or staff member finds an account of yours on the Internet, it should have a professional look to it. This means no pictures of yourself wearing inappropriate clothing, in inappropriate situations, or any other pictures that would create potentially negative conversations at the school where you are working.
 
Stepping In: A Substitute's Guide to Managing Classroom Behavior PDF Print E-mail

Stepping In: A Substitute's Guide to Managing Classroom Behavior by Randy Sprick, Ph.D.

Stepping_In_Perfect_CoverA must read for substitute teachers! This guide has helpful tips for people who are just starting to substitute teach, and is a great review for those who have been in the profession for many years. Randy Sprick writes excellent advice for all educators, not just substitute teachers. Many of Dr. Sprick's suggestions are also recommended by dozens of other educational theorists. The book is an easy read, with five well organized chapters. Important points that should be focused on are often set aside in a "take note" box. Any form that is referenced is located in the back of the book, for substitute teachers to copy and use on their own.

Read more: Stepping In: A Substitute's Guide to Managing Classroom Behavior
 
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